Typing speed troubles!

You have 40 minutes left of class and you only have a concluding paragraph to
 do in order to finish your essay but you only have 40 minutes to think of a good conclusion and type the entire essay that took you over half the period to write. As you sit there, looking at the clock and writing anything that is relevant to your thesis, your heart is beating loudly like a drum and you are finally done the rough copy. 30 minutes left of class, so you fire up your laptop and start typing.

Using a computer for typing up any form of writing is clean and simple but the problem is accuracy on the keyboard. If you are used to typing fast, you probably know by heart all the keys of a keyboard but occasionally, you just want to get the typing done as fast as you can.

According to The National Post, the University of Waterloo held a test to see if  there is a difference if students type with 2 hands or 1 hand. In the end, there were more typos typing with 2 hands due to the speed of typing and less errors when students typed with 1 hand because it reduced the progress time to “handwriting speed”.

Apparently, since using 1 hand slows down the typing speed, students can actually have time to read what they are writing and have a higher chance of seeing typing errors.

Normally when I type, I type at a 69 words per minute meaning I can finish typing a several hundred word essay in probably 20 minutes and spend the rest of the time correcting it. MLA format always gets me in anyway possible from indentations to spacing. What I mostly see is people type up a copy of their rough copy on the computer but never spend the time to actually look at the typos because I assure you, I look over my essays 6 times: 2 for writing accuracy (rough and good copy), 2 for present tense, 1 for grammar and 1 for MLA formatting. 

 sources:

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/speedy-typing-kills-student-essays-as-words-spew-out-faster-than-thoughts-study-shows

Check out your typing speed at:

http://typing-speed-test.aoeu.eu/

Angus

Angus is the Editor-In-Chief and creator of Technology Is Key. He enjoys tech and business and also runs Adventure Bitcoin.

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